Capture of Nicaragua Cocaine Thief Spotlights Pacific Drug Transit

Police in Nicaragua have arrested a man accused of running several of the drug theft gangs known as “tumbadores,” which are one of the principal components of organized crime in the country and across Central America.

Franklin Heriberto Torres Bejarano. Photo: www.elnuevodiario.com.ni
Franklin Heriberto Torres Bejarano. Photo: www.elnuevodiario.com.ni

The flaxen-haired Franklin Heriberto Torres Bejarano, alias “La Pajara,” allegedly headed six groups of tumbadores, totaling 45 members, which robbed cocaine from other traffickers. He was captured in Granada — a tourist town on Lake Nicaragua — where he was renting a home for $1,000 a month, reported El Nuevo Diario.

- payin the bills -

Torres and his tumbadores operated mostly along a thin belt of land between the Pacific coastline and Lake Nicaragua, which serves as a major overland transit point for the shipment of drugs. He has been charged with drug smuggling and money laundering, and police have accused him of robbing at least three shipments of cocaine, including a 200 kilo haul in November 2012.

Torres had been leading the tumbadores since around 2004, and his thievery apparently did not sit well with certain cartel leaders. In 2008 his name was discovered on a hitlist carried by Mexican and Honduran assassins captured by police, reported El Nuevo Diario.

The fact Torres was able to evade both killers and police for so many years indicates he was likely being protected in some way. Tumbadores often work closely with or are even led by corrupt authorities, allowing them to ply a trade that would otherwise lead to a rapid death. They often work as free agents, moving drugs for cartels but also robbing shipments as a means of recouping unpaid debts or hitting rivals, and then splitting the profits with the police who tip them off.

While Nicaragua’s Caribbean coast has attracted more attention in recent years for its growth of crime and violence, the Pacific region where Torres operated also experiences high levels of drug trafficking and “tumbes.”

- paying the bills -

Torres’ home province of Rivas touches the official Peñas Blancas border crossing with Costa Rica and there are a number of nearby blind spots where traffickers can cross over. In contrast with the Caribbean side, where drug shipments are moved by sea and Nicaragua is predominently a stop off and resupply point, the primary transit routes on the Pacific side go overland, leaving them vulnerable to the groups run by Torres and others like him.

Related Articles

Nicaragua still the country with the greatest mobility in Central America in times of pandemic

TODAY NICARAGUA - Eight months after the first case of Covid-19...

Nicaragua restores 95% electricity service

TODAY NICARAGUA - After the damages caused by Hurricane Iota a...

MOST READ

Rosario Murillo: La Heredera (The Heiress)

Rosarion Murillo, the "eternally loyal" to her husband and political partner, Daniel Ortega. In a profile by Confidencial in October 2016, before her election as...

Better Air Connectivity Between Nicaragua and the US

The private companies' association is in talks with United Airlines to promote the opening of a route that connects Nicaragua with the east coast...

Nicaragua Unveils Central America’s Largest Baseball Stadium

Nicaragua has unveiled its long-awaited baseball stadium in Managua, replacing the former baseball field built in 1948. The new structure will hold up to...

Bianca Jagger Gets Into The Nicaragua Act Again

(American Thinker)  Remember Bianca Jagger? You know, the disco queen and former rock-star's wife turned leftwing "human rights activist" who was last seen mourning...

What Are Some of Nicaragua’s Popular Food?

TODAY NICARAGUA - Nicaragua is an interesting place, with a tumultuous history and a relatively peaceful present. and even if many things can be...

Nicaragua Praised by the IMF

The IMF noted the positive evolution of all the country's economic indicators, and the drastic fall in poverty, with an increase of 33% in...

Poll Shows Declining Expectations on a Nicaraguan Canal

According to the results of the most recent survey conducted by Cid Gallup, the Nicaraguan interoceanic canal project, a concession given to the Chinese...

Let's Keep This Going!

To be updated with all the latest news and information about Nicaragua and Latin America.

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.